Start behaving like a child!

At some point in our younger years, we decide to make the transition between being treated as a child to being recognised for the level of maturity the left brain brings. We stop behaving like children and logic and rationality come into play.

This implicates all area’s of our younger lives – we go from living the life we dream of – to the life we are expected to live. If I think back to my younger years, I was at my happiest when I was centre-stage and leader of the pack, which manifested in energy, idea’s, excitement and having a lot of fun. But somewhere along the way, we get conditioned to think that child’s play is just that! We begin to compromise and set our own limiting beliefs around what we believe is possible.

In 2004 when I set up my first company bStrategic, I relished running my businesses in a way that was advancing my clients to the next level. Helping and inspiring businesses gave me the rewards I was seeking through tangible results...

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Does Your Child Find It Difficult to Study?

Often, children find it hard to keep their focus and motivation when studying from home. So, we’ve put together a number of ways to help make studying easier for your child.

Break – Taking regular breaks from studying is vital. This gives your brain a chance to rest and recharge. Your child will then be able to look at their work with a fresh perspective, allowing them to take in more information and come up with new points. Studying is most effective when carried out in 30-45 minute bursts. Top tip: the app Be Focused allows your child to create their own study timetable; time and track their progress; and control both their study and break time.

Rewards – Make sure your child is rewarded for their hard work. This can include time with their friends or a meal out with the family. This offers them a healthy balance between work and play.

Be Inventive – Your child should try a number of different study techniques in order to see what works best for...

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Are you prepared this half-term?

The half-term is upon us! School’s out and the the kids can’t wait for some time to play, but what about us parents and mothers in particular, who rely on that much needed errand-running time?

Here are just a few ideas to keep your child busy while you get on with your day-to-day jobs –

Arts and Crafts – this is a great way to keep kids’ imagination intact over the half term break. Why not set up a workshop (chuck some old cereal boxes, string, etc. on the kitchen table) and see what they come up with. Pinterest is also full of exciting ideas for them to try out.

Sports Day – it’s easy for children to confine themselves to the indoors, but it is crucial they spend as much time as possible outside. Setting up some outdoor activities or even an obstacle course for children won’t only get them out of your hair for a couple of hours but will give them some much needed exercise which they would usually be getting in...

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Celebrating Cultural Diversity

One thing is for certain, the world is becoming more and more globalised by the minute. The UK is more diverse than 10 years ago , rich in culture and various religions. As a nation we are proud of our of our diversity. As parents and teachers, it is crucial in today’s society that we teach our children the importance of understanding and appreciating different cultures. Every child is different, and that is why the appreciation of different cultures is so important. This can be a challenging task; particularly as many of us parents were not taught about the norms of Spanish culture or the Culture of Chinese food as just a few examples!

Although progress has been made in the classroom, with celebrations of religious festivals, religious studies and the increasing language skills classes in secondary education – there are a lot more things that we could be doing both inside and outside school to improve our children’s cultural awareness. There will always be the...

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Stimulating children’s Mathematical skills outside the classroom

Maths is undoubtedly one of the most important subjects within primary and secondary school education, developing a child’s ability to use numbers, time, recognise shapes and change. Not every child dreams to be a mathematician or an accountant, but it is impossible to think of one job that doesn’t involve the basic mathematical principles.

“When am I ever going to use algebra in real life?”, said every child who has ever studied Mathematics. Worksheets and tests work in principle, but are not enough to show children the real importance of the subject and how it is used on a daily basis. So here are some tips and methods on how we can teach our children the basics and importance of mathematics, outside the classroom!

  • The weekly shop (Basic Calculations + Algebra)

The weekly shop is a great way to teach younger children basic calculations in a regular scenario; getting them to work out the cost of the items in the trolley as you go around the store,...

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Reading is embedded into education from an early age and crucial to the development of children’s listening, understanding and vocal skills

 

It also has a major impact on the sociability of children as they grow older, expanding their vocabulary allows them to be confident in speech in and outside the classroom with friends, family and teachers.

The National Literacy Trust introduced the ‘Early Words Together’ programme in 2014 in partnership with 120 children’s centres in the UK targeting children 3-5. The programme resulted in an increase in both vocabulary comprehension and spoken language skills of children. Families involved with the programme experienced higher levels of enjoyment for reading by 77%, proving that active involvement with your child’s reading can have a key impact on their enthusiasm to read. The programme also identified that many parents struggle to find the time to read as amongst the family meaning we must consider different ways to motivate children to read for pleasure.

Similar programmes were rolled out through Primary and Secondary schools to get children...

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The real meaning behind Valentine’s Day and what values our children can take

Legend has it that St.Valentine was a priest in Roman times who secretly performed marriages for soldiers and their lovers against the orders of the cruel Emperor Claudius. Met with his imprisonment, Valentine fell in love with the jail-guard’s daughter and wrote letters signed ‘Love from your Valentine’ before his beheading on February the 14th.

In modern society, Valentine’s day is celebrated as an expression of ‘romantic love’ and feelings through an exchange of cards and gifts such as flowers and chocolates. In the UK alone just under half of the population spend money on their valentines.

For the younger generation, Valentine’s Day is often introduced at an early age, with many primary schools allowing children to create cards and crafts to give to their valentine providing an opportunity to show their creativity. In younger years this is a novelty to children as they hand out gifts and cards to family members teaching the lesson of...

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Is my child spending too much time on the internet?

Over the past 10 years; the internet has played a crucial part in children’s education. From practicing online tests to researching homework questions; it is undoubtedly the largest source of information and educational tool of this day and age. The internet has provided the opportunity for children to learn faster than we ever could!

Schools have also had to adapt to these changes; embracing an online presence, fitting more ‘Internet research’ projects into their syllabuses and introducing computing technology to children from an early age. At the same time, they must teach children of the dangers of the internet.

On average, children between 5-16 spend 3 hours per day surfing the internet (read more…). Being taught ‘the ways of the internet’ from an early age not only presents the opportunity to build upon knowledge, but also the opportunity for our children to waste time on social media, play games and… watch funny cat videos…...

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School Trips – what are parents really concerned about?

 

Lunch boxes at the ready, the coach has arrived and the race is on for the back seat! Some of our greatest childhood memories have come from our school trip experiences. A trip to the local history museum, building sand castles down the beach, there has always been an excitement around learning something outside the four walls of a classroom!

So what has changed for our children? There is certainly a larger variety of available trips that range in price and subject matter. The term ‘educational trips’ has been expanded to not only include trips that focus on national curriculum topics, but also aim to provide children with better social and life skills. In today’s post we speak to Lauren (Parent of 4, Year 2, 5 and 8) to explore what parents are really concerned about when it comes to school trips.

Do you believe school trips have become more expensive?

“I would never let my children go without, but school trips can be expensive, particularly as...

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Homework Time

Picture the first thing that comes into your head when you hear the word homework… It is most likely that you are picturing a child sitting at their desk with a pencil, a piece of paper and a notebook; or in this new day and age, a computer. Well there is always going to be an element of paperwork, but there is progress in transforming what we used to call ‘homework chores’ into stimulating learning activities for children.

In today’s blog post we discuss with parents the challenges that they face with homework in the modern schooling system, how a parent can best help their child with their homework and where future improvements can be made.

After a busy day at school, homework is sometimes the last thing a child wants to think about, resulting in children ‘accidentally’ forgetting to mention they have homework, putting it off, or the classic (in particular with younger children) not understanding the homework.

Ravinder (parent of 2, Years 6 and...

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